Gallery

Gallery of Canon G12

Last year, my Canon G12 died, so I decided to make a gallery of a few of my favorite images that came from that camera.  This is my first gallery post.

Just click on one of the small pictures to launch a carousel of higher resolution images.  (If you set your browser to full screen (press F11 in Chrome and Firefox), the images should display even larger).

May God bless you.

The End of My Canon G12

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Recently, I had the opportunity to visit Boyd Lake State Park in Colorado.

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I got up at about 6 am to see the sunrise.  It looked like it might be a beautiful sunrise, so I walked down to the water with my trusted and beloved Canon G12 camera.

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A crane and some ducks foraged for breakfast.

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As I approached the water, the fowl moved off to the side in the bluer areas of the scene.

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The sky toward the sun started out very red with a hint of purple in the clouds.

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Down by the water’s edge, the whole scene was filled with light and color.  Little by little the light shifted from red to orange.

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The blues away from the sun made a beautiful contrast.

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The colors constantly turned and changed as the sky brightened into brilliant orange.  (Some of these photos are best viewed by clicking on them, and viewing a larger size).

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Some of the best sunrises and sunsets are when the sun shines underneath cloud cover causing the clouds to reflect back the light from the sun.  In this case, the clouds reflected the sun, and the water reflected the clouds.  This effect doubled the light.

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This wide angle shot pulled back from the lake to show the full pallet of color.  The sun is just starting to appear, and the colors are retreating.  Please notice the magenta just to the right of the main sunrise.  I tried to capture that color, but failed because my camera malfunctioned on those pictures.

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At this point, most of the pictures were horribly overexposed due to what I think may have been a malfunctioning computer or shutter.  This one turned out okay.

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The light receded off the water even further.

After the above photo, it was clear that something was terribly wrong, and it wasn’t going to fix itself.  I kept snapping photos, but they were all white and covered in lines.  That magenta color would never get its own shot.  Eventually, I would get one last photo:

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The very last photo.

Then the sun rose above the clouds, and the colors faded to gray.  “The Lord gave, and the Lord has taken away; blessed be the name of the Lord.” (Job 1:21, ESV).

And now a moment of photographic silence in honor of my departed G12.

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G12 Electronic Level and Estes Cone

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Recently, God blessed me with the opportunity to go hiking in Colorado.  We got sick, so we were not able to hike as much as we had planned, nonetheless, we were able to hike to Dream Lake (elevation 9912′), Emerald Lake (10,090′), and to the summit of Estes Cone (11,006′).  The picture above was taken in a meadow on the hike to Estes Cone.

According to Trails.com, Estes Cone is an inactive volcano.  Ascending to the summit of Estes Cone involves mostly hiking and some climbing.  On the hike to the summit, I snapped an occasional picture, but felt dissatisfied with the photograph’s representation of the steepness of the terrain.  The hike looked too flat.  Then I remembered that my Canon G12 camera has a built in electronic level, and that I had recently calibrated the level:  It was accurate.

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The picture above is the first picture I took using the electronic level.

The picture below was taken using the electronic level (while on the climb to the summit).  The taller mountains are on the left, so the horizon itself is not perfectly horizontal.

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The picture below was taken on the way down from the summit.  Notice the man standing in the upper left of the picture.  Most people stand straight vertical, but having an electronic level built into the camera is still an excellent and handy tool.

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I appreciated the interplay of light and shadow on the other mountains in the distance (Mount Meeker, Longs Peak, Mount Lady Washington, etc).

The Lord is gracious, and may He bless you.

Neutral Density Filter

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My Canon G12 camera has an internal neutral density filter that can be applied inside the camera with the click of a button.  A neutral density filter is designed to reduce the amount of light hitting the camera’s sensor without affecting color.  This allows the photographer to open the shutter for longer periods of time while still accurately recording the amount of light and color in a scene.

This technique can be used to blur (or erase) moving objects, and is best used with moving water or busy city streets.  It can give a photograph with moving objects a slightly more dreamy quality than an average snap-shot.

The picture above is a fifteen second exposure of Lake Winnebago at dusk.  Please notice the somewhat smooth dreamy reflections in the water.  (The motion blur of the water causes this effect).

The snap-shot below was taken earlier in the evening and from a different location, so it may not be the best comparison, but please notice the sharper detail in the water.

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New Camera: G12

God has given me a new camera, a Canon G12, and I don’t think I’m taking it back.  Almost every picture shared here on Light from Light was taken with a Canon a550.  The a550 is an excellent camera, and I plan to still use it.  Maybe it will be transferred to hazardous duty, such as cross-country skiing and mountain biking.

I am hoping the G12 will take certain photos to the next level.  Also, the G12 will be a stepping stone for me as I continue to learn the ins and outs of photography.

Everything is in God’s hands.