Good Friday 2017

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He took our bad, and replaced it with his good.  This Friday is good.

How blest shall be, Eternally
Who oft in faith will ponder
Why the glorious Prince of life
Should be buried yonder.

O Jesus blest, My Help and Rest,
With tears I now entreat you:
Make me love you to the last
Till in heaven I greet you.

— “Oh, Darkest Woe,” CW 137:4-5.

The colors and light in the photograph are soft and heavenly because the harsh cross that Christ endured is the way to heaven.  Good Friday is the way to Resurrection Sunday.

“It is finished!”

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Good Friday 2016

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It is finished!

Χριστός,

Α Ω.

Good Friday 2015

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It is finished.

Α Ω

Blessed Good Friday 2014

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Good Friday.

“It is finished.”

Α Ω

Good Friday

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Mark 15:16-24:

The soldiers led Jesus away into the palace … and called together the whole company of soldiers.  They put a purple robe on him, then twisted together a crown of thorns and set it on him.  And they began to call out to him, “Hail, king of the Jews!”  Again and again they struck him on the head with a staff and spit on him.  Falling on their knees, they paid homage to him.  And when they had mocked him, they took off the purple robe and put his own clothes on him.  Then they led him out to crucify him…

They brought Jesus to the place called Golgotha (which means The Place of the Skull).  Then they offered him wine mixed with myrrh, but he did not take it.  And they crucified him.

In Psalm 22:16 the prophet wrote of the coming Messiah:

Dogs have surrounded me;
a band of evil men has encircled me,
they have pierced my hands and my feet.

About 700 years B.C. (Before Christ), the Prophet Isaiah wrote (in chapter 53) about the coming Messiah:

He had no beauty or majesty to attract us to him,
nothing in his appearance that we should desire him.

He was despised and rejected by men,
a man of sorrows, and familiar with suffering.
Like one from whom men hide their faces
he was despised, and we esteemed him not.

Surely he took up our infirmities
and carried our sorrows,
yet we considered him stricken by God,
smitten by him, and afflicted.

But he was pierced for our transgressions,
he was crushed for our iniquities;
the punishment that brought us peace was upon him,
and by his wounds we are healed.

We all, like sheep, have gone astray,
each of us has turned to his own way;
and the LORD has laid on him
the iniquity of us all.

He was oppressed and afflicted,
yet he did not open his mouth;
he was led like a lamb to the slaughter,
and as a sheep before her shearers is silent,
so he did not open his mouth.

By oppression and judgment he was taken away.
And who can speak of his descendants?
For he was cut off from the land of the living;
for the transgression of my people he was stricken.

He was assigned a grave with the wicked,
and with the rich in his death,
though he had done no violence,
nor was any deceit in his mouth…

After the suffering of his soul,
he will see the light of life and be satisfied;
by his knowledge my righteous servant will justify many,
and he will bear their iniquities.

Therefore I will give him a portion among the great,
and he will divide the spoils with the strong,
because he poured out his life unto death,
and was numbered with the transgressors.
For he bore the sin of many,
and made intercession for the transgressors.

“It is finished.”  — Jesus

Throned upon the Awe-full Tree

Throned upon the awe-full tree,
King of grief, I watch with Thee.
Darkness veils Thine anguished face;
None its lines of woe can trace,
None can tell what pangs unknown
Hold Thee silent and alone.

Hark the cry that peals aloud
Upward through the whelming cloud!
Thou, the Father’s only Son,
Thou, His own Anointed One,
Thou dost ask Him, Can it be?
“Why has Thou forsaken Me?”

— “Throned upon the Awe-full Tree,”
The Lutheran Hymnal, 174:1, 3.